How to grow a Pitcher Plant

How to grow a Pitcher Plant

Forget about what someone told you at the store. I purchased this late last summer and was told to water it by putting a drop of water in the pitchers and do not worry about the pot because the pitcher plant does not get its water or nutrients through the roots/pot. HMMMM is what I thought but since I have never purchased one before I took the advice.

IT WAS SO WRONG! I am so lucky that I did not kill the poor thing. By the time October came I brought it inside and all the pitchers had fallen off. It looked pathetic and so I decided to try something different.

So here is what I did: kept it in the same small pot and hung it in the East window. My home is around 65 degrees in winter and the humidity unknown. I watered the plant about every 5 days with rain barrel water (or filtered water in the dead of winter) over the kitchen sink where I watered the plant, trying to soak the potting mix, and let the water run out in the sink. When it was done dripping, I hung it back up in the window (on the curtain rod because the pot weight about a pound so it does not hurt rod). It took all winter for any new growth and about February I noticed pitchers forming. By March, I noticed the bulb of a pitcher forming and it seemed like overnight that the pitcher grew to this size. This pitcher was double the size of the pitchers on the plant when I bought it.

This is just one of the largest pitchers on the plant. As of today there are 3 very large pitchers which are dramatically bigger than when I bought the plant last August. There are many curls that will turn into pitchers too. I cannot wait to put the Pitcher plant outside on the deck under the gazebo and see how attractive it is now to the flies, bees, and other insects that the pitchers are attracting.

I hope that I give you confidence to purchase one of the plants this summer and put in the shade, on the porch, or under a gazebo to catch those dang insects. Just remember to bring it in when the temps get down to about 55 degrees because this is a tropical plant. This is just one of the largest pitchers on the plant. As of today there are 3 very large pitchers which are dramatically bigger than when I bought the plant last August.

Creating. Inspiring. Gardening without the rules!

2014/15 Copyrighted material from C Renee Fuller @ The Garden Frog Boutique

Enjoy and Happy Gardening!
Kingdom: Plantae (Plants)
Subkingdom: Embryophyta
Division: Tracheophyta (Vascular Plants)
Subdivision: Spermatophyta (Seed Plants)
Class: Angiosperms (Flowering Plants)
Subclass: Monocotyledons (Monocots)
Families: Nepenthaceae and Sarraceniaceae – See more at: http://www.carnivorous–plants.com/pitcher-plant.html#sthash.Asyk06nq.dpuf

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